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Central Health executive members to spend minimum of two days per week in Grand Falls-Windsor and Gander

Two independent investigations into Central Health's administration were announced in the same week after complaints from staff about alleged mismanagement and unfair treatment.
Two independent investigations into Central Health's administration were announced in the same week after complaints from staff about alleged mismanagement and unfair treatment. - Clarence Ngoh

The presence of Central Health executive in central hospitals should be more noticeable this year.

The regional health authority stated in an email to The Central Voice the three executive members located in Grand Falls-Windsor have moved from the corporate office – two kilometres away – to West Block, next to the Central Newfoundland Regional Health Centre. Two executive members located in Gander will maintain offices at James Paton Memorial Regional Health Centre.

The health authority is still recruiting a Medical Services and Chief of Staff vice-president, and Central Health states it is unknown where this office will be located.
Furthermore, all executive members are expected to spend an average of two days per week in both Gander and Grand Falls-Windsor, along with visits to other regional facilities.
The action taken was in response to a recommendation from Dr. Peter Vaughn who conducted an external review of Central Health operations.

By having the executive having a stronger presence at both hospitals, Vaughn said, it prevents the alienation of staff.

Central Health clarified this did not mean splitting management between the buildings equally. Rather, it was “in an effort to be more visible throughout the region.”

Hazel Bishop, president and CEO of the Gander and Area Chamber of Commerce, called any movement on recommendations from Vaughn’s report a good thing.
Bishop was one of many who spoke about the need for the review.
And she’s pleased to see executive working within the hospitals, as it provides communication access points and gives a sense of operational needs.
But even though the recommendation is marked completed by Central Health, Bishop still has her skepticism.
“There’s still lots more to be done, and it appears to be headed in the right direction, but it remains to be seen how visible they will be,” she said. “Communication is key, it’s about trying to let the staff and general public know they are working with both major locations for the betterment of patient care and the overall operation of Central Health.”

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